Australian Citizenship Test Questions and Answers

The best way to determine whether you have prepared enough for the Citizenship Test is to solve a few sample questions. If the questions are too difficult for you then you might want to invest a bit more time going back to work with study book or the audio-visual study videos.

All questions are based on the 3 testable section within the official study book. Click on a section to get to the sample Australian Citizenship Test questions and answers:

Part 1: Australia and its people

1. When did the first fleet arrive in Australia?

  1. 26th January 1788
  2. 26th January 1786
  3. 28th January 1788

a. 26th January 1788

European settlement started when the first 11 convict ships, which became known as the ‘First Fleet’, arrived from Great Britain on 26 January 1788.

2. Who was the first governor of the colony New South Wales?

  1. Captain Phillip Arthur
  2. Captain Samuel Cook
  3. Captain Arthur Philipp

c. Captain Arthur Philipp

The first governor of the colony of New South Wales was Captain Arthur Phillip.

3. In which colony / colonies were gold discovered in 1851?

  1. New South Wales
  2. Victoria
  3. New South Wales and Victoria

c. New South Wales and Victoria

In 1851, gold was discovered in the colonies of New South Wales and Victoria. People from all around the world came to these colonies to try their luck at making a fortune.

4. When was the Commonwealth of Australia founded?

  1. 1901
  2. 1902
  3. 1903

a. 1901

In 1901, the colonies were united into a federation of states called the Commonwealth of Australia. At that time, Australia’s population was counted at about four million people. This number did not include the Indigenous people.

5. What is Australia’s current population?

  1. approx. 17 million
  2. approx. 22 million
  3. approx. 27 million

b. approx. 22 million

Today, Australia has a population of about 22 million people. Over one quarter of these people were born overseas.

6. How many states & territories are in Australia?

  1. 8
  2. 6
  3. 7

a. 8

The Commonwealth of Australia is a federation of states and territories. There are six states and two mainland territories.

7. What is Australia’s Capital City?

  1. Sydney
  2. Melbourne
  3. Canberra

c. Canberra

Canberra is Australia’s capital city.

8. What is the capital of the Northern Territory?

  1. Darwin
  2. Cairns
  3. Port Douglas

a) Darwin

9. What is the capital of the Tasmania?

  1. Auckland
  2. Wellington
  3. Hobart

c) Hobart

10. When is Australia Day celebrated?

  1. 26th January
  2. 25th April
  3. 26th April

a. 26th January

On 26 January each year,  Australia Day is celebrated. Australia Day is a public holiday in every state and territory in Australia.

Part 2: Australia’s democratic beliefs, rights and liberties

1. What are Australia’s democratic beliefs?

  1. peace, respect, freedom and equality
  2. tradition, freedom and responsibility
  3. peace, freedom and equality

a. peace, respect, freedom and equality

Australians believe in peace, respect, freedom and equality.

2. What is Australia’s system of government?

  1. presidential republic
  2. constitutional democracy
  3. parliamentary democracy

c. parliamentary democracy

Australia’s system of government is a parliamentary democracy. This means that all Australians are involved in how the country is governed. The power of the government comes from the Australian people because Australian citizens regularly vote for people to represent them in parliament. Only parliament has the power to make and change the laws that govern the country.

3. Which organ can make and change the laws that govern the country?

  1. The Prime Minister of Australia
  2. The Queen of England
  3. The Parliament of Australia

c. The Parliament of Australia

Only parliament has the power to make and change the laws that govern the country.

4. What is described by the rule of law?

  1. All Australians must obey the law. If they don’t obey the law, they may be deported from the country
  2. All Australians are equal under the law and no person or group is above the law
  3. All Australians can make suggestions to the law

b. All Australians are equal under the law and no person or group is above the law

All Australians are equal under the law and no person or group is above the law. This is called the ‘rule of law’.

5. What is the Australian mateship?

  1. All male Australians strive to celebrate father’s day on the mate-ship
  2. People in Australian should always greet each other
  3. People in Australia strive to help each other

c. People in Australia strive to help each other

In Australia, there is a spirit of ‘mateship’. This means we help and receive help from each other in times of need. A mate is often a friend, but can also be a total stranger. A mate might take a meal to an elderly neighbour, drive a friend to a medical appointment or visit someone who is lonely.

6. Which of the following is NOT one of Australia’s freedoms?

  1. Freedom of organisation
  2. Freedom of speech and freedom of expression
  3. Freedom of religion and secular government

a. Freedom of organisation

Australia’s freedoms are Freedom of speech and freedom of expression, Freedom or Association and Freedom of religion and secular government

7. Which statement about Australia’s equalities is not correct?

  1. All Australian men and women have the opportunity to go to university
  2. People in Australia are free to follow any religion
  3. All Australian men and women can join the Army, Navy and Air Force

a. All Australian men and women have the opportunity to go to university

8. What are NOT necessarily your responsibilities as an Australian Citizen?

  1. vote in federal and state or territory elections, and in a referendum
  2. seek election to parliament
  3. defend Australia should the need arise

b. seek election to parliament

9. What is the required age to seek election to parliament?

  1. aged 16 years or over
  2. aged 18 years or over
  3. aged 21 years or over

b. aged 18 years or over

Australian citizens aged 18 years or over can seek election to parliament at the federal, state or territory level. It is both an honour and a serious responsibility to serve in an Australian parliament.

Part 3: Government and the law in Australia

1. Australia is a …?

  1. constitutional republic
  2. republican monarchy
  3. constitutional monarchy

c. constitutional monarchy

Australia is a constitutional monarchy.

2. How many Senators are elected into the senate from each state?

  1. 10
  2. 12
  3. 14

b. 12

The states are equally represented in the Senate, regardless of their population size. There are 12 representatives elected from each state. Both mainland territories elect two representatives each. There are 76 representatives elected in total and they are called Senators.

3. Who is the Queens representative in Australia?

  1. Head of State
  2. Governor-General
  3. Prime Minister

b. Governor-General

In Australia, the Queen does not have a day-to-day role in government. The Queen appoints the Governor-General as her representative in Australia, on advice from the Australian Prime Minister. The Governor-General acts independently of all political parties.

4. What are the two Houses that represent the Australian Parliament?

  1. The House of Representatives and the Senate
  2. The Lower House and the People’s House
  3. The Senate and the Upper House

a. The House of Representatives and the Senate

The House of Representatives (also known as the Lower House or the People’s House) and the Senate (also known as the Upper House, the House of Review or the States’ House) build the Australian Government.

5. How many members does Lower House have?

  1. 50
  2. 100
  3. 150

c. 150

The number of MPs for each state and territory is based on the size of its population. The people of Australia elect a total of 150 members to the House of Representatives.

6. Which goverment(s) is responsible for police in Australia?

  1. The Federal Government
  2. The State and territory governments
  3. The Local governments

b. The State and territory governments

The State and territory governments are responsible for hospitals and health services, schools, railways, roads and road traffic control, forestry, police, public transport.

7. Who appoints the judges and magistrates?

  1. The Prime Minister
  2. The Governor-General
  3. The Australian Government

c. The Australian Government

Judges and magistrates are appointed by the government, but the government cannot take their jobs away if it disagrees with their decisions.

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